Mediterranean diet for students

Students with a higher commitment to the Mediterranean diet go to bed earlier, sleep better and think more clearly during the day. The results of a new study show that university students who adhere to the Mediterranean diet have improved overall sleep quality compared to their colleagues who did not adhere to this diet. The UAE observed a group of 503 students from the University of Sharjah for five months in early 2021 to make such a conclusion. In recent years, the quality of sleep around the world has been declining at an "alarming rate", which is largely to blame for the excessive use of smartphones at night. However, the scientists wanted to investigate the less-studied relationship between nutrition and sleep quality. Previous studies have shown that poor sleep quality is associated with an increased risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. University students are at the greatest risk of sleep disorders. The researchers used the Mediterranean Diet Quality Index (KIDMED), the most widely used index for assessing adherence to the Mediterranean diet among young people, to determine that 54% of participants had medium or high adherence to a healthy diet, 46% - low. The results of a new study show that university students who adhere to the Mediterranean diet have improved overall sleep quality compared to their colleagues who did not adhere to this diet. The Mediterranean diet involves the abundant use of olive oil in food, lots of fresh vegetables and the replacement of red meat with chicken or turkey or seafood.